Contact the Library

Tina Schneider
Professor/Library Director
567-242-7214
schneider.290@osu.edu

Zach Walton
Reference & Instruction Librarian

567-242-7235
walton.485@osu.edu

Jennifer Schnabel
English Librarian, Columbus Campus

614-688-5861
schnabel.23@osu.edu

Lima Campus Library Online Hours

Monday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Saturday/Sunday: Closed

Call or e-mail the library
lima-library@osu.edu
567-242-7330

OSU @ Lima Campus Library

There are many more resources available to help you excel on your research projects, and you can reach them from the Lima Campus Library website.

Resources

To find books, you are going to use the library's catalog, below.

The Lima Campus Library (and a great many academic libraries) is organized by a system known as 'Library of Congress'. That means that books or grouped together by subject rather than author, letting you know where you can go to browse and potentially find some interesting books on the topic.

If you want help finding a book in the library, just print out the page from the catalog and bring it to the library. We're here to help!

Advanced Search>>
 
Advanced Search>>

Listed below are databases that can lead you to articles from scholarly journals in the field of English and related fields. If you want a refresher on using databases, please get in touch with us at the library.

For a complete list of all of OSU's databases, please click here.

The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and these resources are provided as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects.

Purdue OWL MLA Formatting and Style Guide

Fonts

  • Select a single sans-serif fonts such as Arial or Helvetica. Avoid serif fonts such as Times New Roman or Palatino because these fonts are sometimes more difficult to read.
  • Use no font size smaller than 24 point.
  • Use the same font for all your headlines.
  • Select a font for body copy and another for headlines.
  • Use bold and different sizes of those fonts for captions and subheadings.
  • Add a fourth font for page numbers or as a secondary body font for sidebars.
  • Don’t use more than four fonts in any one publication.
  • Clearly label each screen. Use a larger font (35-45 points) or different color for the title.
  • Use larger fonts to indicate importance.
  • Use different colors, sizes and styles (e.g., bold) for impact.
  • Avoid italicized fonts as these are difficult to read quickly.
  • Avoid long sentences.
  • Avoid abbreviations and acronyms.
  • Limit punctuation marks.
  • No more than 6-8 words per line
  • For bullet points, use the 6 x 6 Rule. One thought per line with no more than 6 words per line and no more than 6 lines per slide
  • Use dark text on light background or light text on dark background. However, dark backgrounds sometimes make it difficult for some people to read the text.
  • Do not use all caps except for titles.
  • Put repeating elements (like page numbers) in the same location on each page of a multi-page document.
  •  To test the font, stand six feet from the monitor and see if you can read the slide.

Design and Graphical Images

  • Use design templates.
  • Standardize position, colors, and styles.
  • Include only necessary information.
  • Limit the information to essentials.
  • Content should be self-evident
  • Use colors that contrast and compliment.
  • Too may slides can lose your audience.
  • Keep the background consistent and subtle.
  • Limit the number of transitions used. It is often better to use only one so the audience knows what to expect.
  • Use a single style of dingbat for bullets throughout the page.
  • Use the same graphical rule at the top of all pages in a multi-page document.
  • Use one or two large images rather than several small images.
  • Prioritize images instead of a barrage of images for competing attention.
  • Make images all the same size.
  • Use the same border.
  • Arrange images vertically or horizontally.
  • Use only enough text when using charts or graphical images to explain the chart or graph and clearly label the image.
  • Keep the design clean and uncluttered. Leave empty space around the text and graphical images.
  • Use quality clipart and use it sparingly. A graphical image should relate to and enhance the topic of the slide.
  • Try to use the same style graphical image throughout the presentation (e.g., cartoon, photographs)
  • Limit the number of graphical images on each slide.
  • Repetition of an image reinforces the message. Tie the number of copies of an image to the numbers in your text.
  • Resize, recolor, reverse to turn one image into many. Use duplicates of varying sizes, colors, and orientations to multiply the usefulness of a single clip art image.
  • Make a single image stand out with dramatic contrast. Use color to make a dramatic change to a single copy of your clip art.
  • Check all images on a projection screen before the actual presentation.
  • Avoid flashy images and noisy animation effects unless it relates directly to the slide.

Color

  • Limit the number of colors on a single screen.
  • Bright colors make small objects and thin lines stand out. However, some vibrant colors are difficult to read when projected.
  • Use no more than four colors on one chart.
  • Check all colors on a projection screen before the actual presentation. Colors may project differently than what appears on the monitor.
  • Color combinations to avoid because they are a potential issue for persons with certain types of vision problems:
    • Green & Red
    • Green & Brown
    • Green & Blue
    • Green & Gray
    • Green & Black
    • Light Green & Yellow
    • Blue & Purple
    • Blue & Grey

General Presentation

  • Plan carefully.
  • Do your research.
  • Know your audience.
  • Time your presentation.
  • Speak comfortably and clearly.
  • Check the spelling and grammar.
  • Do not read the presentation. Practice the presentation so you can speak from bullet points. The text should be a cue for the presenter rather than a message for the viewer.
  • Give a brief overview at the start. Then present the information. Finally review important points.
  • It is often more effective to have bulleted points appear one at a time so the audience listens to the presenter rather than reading the screen.
  • Use a wireless mouse or pick up the wired mouse so you can move around as you speak.
  • If sound effects are used, wait until the sound has finished to speak.
  • If the content is complex, print the slides so the audience can take notes.
  • Do not turn your back on the audience. Try to position the monitor so you can speak from it.

Tips for Making Effective PowerPoint Presentations
 

  • Use the slide master feature to create a consistent and simple design template. It is fine to vary the content presentation (i.e., bulleted list, 2-column text, text & image), but be consistent with other elements such as font, colors, and background.
  • Simplify and limit the number of words on each screen. Use key phrases and include only essential information.
  • Limit punctuation and avoid putting words in all capital letters. Empty space on the slide will enhance readability.
  • Use contrasting colors for text and background. Light text on a dark background is best. Patterned backgrounds can reduce readability of text.
  • Avoid the use of flashy transitions such as text fly-ins. These features may seem impressive at first, but are distracting and get old quickly.
  • Overuse of special effects such as animation and sounds may make your presentation “cutesy” and could negatively impact your credibility.
  • Use good quality images that reinforce and complement your message. Ensure that your image maintains its impact and resolution when projected on a larger screen.
  • If you use builds (lines of text appearing each time you click the mouse), have content appear on the screen in a consistent, simple manner; from the top or left is best. Only “build” screens when necessary to make your point because builds can slow your presentation.
  • Limit the number of slides. Presenters who constantly “flip” to the next slide are likely to lose their audience. A good rule of thumb is one slide per minute.
  • Learn to navigate your presentation in a non-linear fashion. PowerPoint allows the presenter to jump ahead or back without having to page through all the interim slides.
  • Know how to and practice moving forward AND backward within your presentation. Audiences often ask to see the previous screen again.
  • If possible, view your slides on the screen you’ll be using for your presentation. Make sure slides are readable from the back row seats. Text and graphical images should be large enough to read, but not so large as to appear “loud.”
  • Have a Plan B in the event of technical difficulties. Remember that transparencies and handouts will not show animation or other special effects.
  • Practice with someone who has never seen your presentation. Ask them for honest feedback about colors, content, and any effects or graphical images you’ve included.
  • Do not read from your slides. The content of your slides is for the audience, not for the presenter.
  • Do not speak to your slides. Many presenters face the direction of their presentation rather than their audience.
  • Do not apologize for anything in your presentation. If you believe something will be hard to read or understand, don’t use it.
  • When possible, run your presentation from a flash drive. 

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